Blog

A FATHER THROUGH HIS CHILDREN’S EYES

June 18 2020

One day in a year is not enough to thank and honor fathers and acknowledge their special place in our lives. Fathers are important male figures in our lives that raise us, extend their love, and guide us through various phases of our lives. These men enrich our lives through their sacrifice and influence our lives constantly.

Fathers who play an active role in raising their children bring up confident and well-adjusted adults. Madonna King writes, ‘A good father relationship can empower daughters to believe in themselves. It can bestow upon a girl a sense of belonging, a self-efficacy and a resilience in life.” Fathers help with mental and emotional development of their children by encouraging competition, building self-esteem and self-image. 

Asante Africa Foundation is privileged to have fathers amongst us who are rising to the ultimate challenge of fatherhood:

Chris Mkado – Scholarship Manager, Asante Africa, Kenya

Chris talks about what fatherhood is for him. He states, “I grew up in a family of 10 in rural western Kenya. As in many rural settings, life had its fair share of challenges and being resilient somehow came naturally to us. But that’s not how I remember it; I remember a big family sharing love. Then, I got married and over the last 13 years we have been blessed with 5 kids (3 girls and 2 boys). We also took in my brother’s 3 children who lost their mother to cancer.

I attribute my growth to my father who I admire a lot. He played a big role in shaping me into the man I am today. He taught me to analyze a goal holistically and work in bits towards achieving it. He called it ‘the quarter system,’ which I employ constantly in my current life. Being a father now, I see how important it is to be present in your children’s lives, helping them overcome challenges and teaching them life lessons. I endeavor to raise my children to be more responsible, resilient, visionary, and open-minded. I believe this will help them in dealing with challenges and aid them in achieving their goals. I want them to learn that life is not offered on a silver platter, but one has to work hard for it; strong principles and a positive attitude will take them far. I want them to take personal initiative in everything that they undertake. I also impress upon my children that frequently evaluating and transforming their life for the better is one of the most powerful mindset one can embrace.”

Fatherhood takes love. There are ups and downs at times, but because of the love and commitment you have for your children, you are able to soldier on. You need to be kind, understanding, and hardworking, and be willing to put the interest of your family first. One has to be a good listener and ready to come to the level of the children and show them that they are great people who have potential to become the best they can be.

From Asante Africa Foundation to you:

“To the world, you are a dad, to us you are the world. To all great men out there, thank you for all you do! Happy Father’s Day!”

What is it kids will say they like and dislike most about you? We asked.

“My kids will say they love my friendly and approachable nature and they always know they can come to me if they have a problem. However, they dislike how I push them to finish simple tasks on time, such as homework.

I am overwhelmed with love when we are playing or they are trying to teach me new things. Their innovativeness often surprises me. We spend time learning positive lessons, playing football or indoor monopoly, eating, taking drives, and shopping together.

I am grateful Asante Africa has offered me an opportunity to work with young people who I really value. By transforming the lives of the young people, we are influencing the future in a big way. In the course of my work, I am able to witness how positive relationships with fathers foster the growth of confident young men and women. To all fathers, the energy and strength given to us is unimaginable. Never turn away from your children and let them suffer. Be positive and know that your small contributions into your children’s lives really count and affect generations to come.”